Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Rectangle 212 + Rectangle 212 + Rectangle 212 Created with Sketch. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Twitter Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta.

4 May 2017

Sustainability in Pulp and Paper Industry - Part 2

The pulp and paper industry has strong environmental credentials. Environmental responsibility and greater sustainability are standardised across the industry but the means, economic development and industrial development remains pools apart. This is exemplified by the fundamental differences between the regulatory environment in Europe and in China.

In this second part of articles on Sustainability and Energy Efficiency we are looking into environmental scenarios in Europe and  in China  ; What are the challenges – what steps should and could be taken?

Europe

The European directive structure is in a transitional phase. Multiple directives exist as an umbrella, but they do not specifically control any single industry or area. For each industry, including pulp and paper, specific guidelines have been defined through industry-specific compilations of commonly agreed threshold levels in areas such as emissions levels.

China

The Chinese pulp and paper industry has undergone a significant expansion over the last few decades, measured in terms of fibre or paper/board production. The number of mills has decreased but average capacity has grown. From sustainability perspective; Chinese large, modern mills are performing well, while smaller units with less modern technology have the most development potential. Many sustainability challenges are associated with insufficient deployment of state-of-the-art engineering solutions and modern technology.

Chinese pulp mills can already comply with the Chinese solid waste disposal or with the Chinese gaseous emission standards, but not necessarily with the international BAT-level guidelines (such as the new EU IED and the state-of-the-art NCG-elimination systems), primarily due to excessive use of fossil fuels, notably coal.

Read the full article (in PDF format below)

*The original articles were published in Paper Asia magazine 2016-2017

Related material

Contact information

Tom Lind
Vice President, Technology and New Solutions