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SUSTAINABILITY IN PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY - PART 3 / 18 May 2017

Sustainability in Pulp and Paper Industry - Part 3

More demands are constantly placed on the pulp and paper industry, in terms of quality targets and sustainability. On the other hand, direct costs are typically increasing and main machinery gets easily obsolete. This equation is often challenging but certainly not impossible to solve. Correctly planned engineering actions are keys to overcoming this challenge.

In this third part of the article series  on Sustainability and Energy Efficiency  we are addressing the topic of Engineering Energy Efficiency

The devil is in the details; i.e. there are no easy single tricks to improve the overall energy efficiency of an operating plant. However, a structured approach to improve the efficiency needs to be employed.

In practice this means focusing on a single piece of equipment and evaluating short payback items. Virtually each mill has multiple non-identified improvement objects that, by correct measures, can have payback times shorter than one year.

Traditionally, efficiency improvement has been focused on shaping the development to gain cost reductions in consumption of utilities (water, electricity, steam, fuels etc.), in addition to gaining more from less (i.e. improving the utilization of raw materials). These drivers are solely focused on improving the cost structure of the business. Especially in the past, improved efficiency was often associated with lower quality parameters, unfavorable compromises and increased complexity in daily operations.

During recent years, image related elements, such as sustainability, social responsibility and different political initiatives have shaped the decision-making more than anticipated 20-30 years ago. Increased prices of electricity and authority demands (permitting) also support the efficiency development. All these factors together impact the stakeholder networks in general.

In this part we  will discuss and highlight some typical improvement areas in the pulp and paper industry, supported by discussion related to general energy consumption development over recent decades. Full version of article and related parts 1 & 2 available below in pdf format.

Related material

Contact information

Tom Lind
Vice President, Technology and New Solutions
+358 40 554 0165