Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Rectangle 212 + Rectangle 212 + Rectangle 212 Created with Sketch. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Twitter Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta. Slice 1 Created with Sketch Beta.

OTHER NEWS 16 Oct 2015

Pöyry's Petri Vasara speaks at the prestigious Marcus Wallenberg Prize Symposium

Dr Petri Vasara, Head of Biofutures at Pöyry, had the honour of being one of the lecturers at the prestigious Marcus Wallenberg Prize Symposium, held on September 29, in Stockholm, Sweden. 

His thoughts on “Nanocellulose - Challenges on the Road to Markets” together with the other presentations can be viewed on the MWP website.

The Marcus Wallenberg Prize of SEK 2 million is awarded annually to recognise, encourage and simulate path breaking scientific achievements which contribute significantly to broadening knowledge and to technical development within the fields of importance to forestry and forest industries. 

The 2015 Marcus Wallenberg Prize was awarded to a group of researchers from Japan and France for their development of an energy-efficient method to produce nanofibrillated cellulose. Their discovery on using a specific oxidation reaction as a tool to open up the wood material prior to mechanical disintegration has reduced the energy demand dramatically. 

Nanofibrillated cellulose has great potentials. Stabilisers in chemicals, food and cosmetics, raw materials for new types of textile fibres or composites or materials for wound dressing are just a few examples of the wide field of possible applications. This nanoscale material has a surface area and shape that enables the formation of strong networks. The manufacturing process where the wood pulp is mechanically broken down to its nanoscale building blocks is however very energy-intensive, which has hampered industrial interest so far.